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that led back to the vatican as well. a lot of questions about what it would be. john paul ii, thinking about resigning, prepared letters of resignation, and both from 197. he turned 75 and 80, never went ahead with the resignations that he was thinking about. but it will be interesting to hear more as we understand why the pope -- the reasons behind why the pope has been called to resign, which will happen on february 28th. >>> other stories making news this morning. john berman has that too. >>> talking about the storm here. families and businesses in seven counties trying to recover from a violent tornado that tore a path through southern mississippi on sunday. ripping apart homes, shops, and causing damage to a university campus. 4,000 homes are still without power. 16 people are injured. and a storm chaser captured this terrifying sight. a funnel cloud in hattiesburg. that took the brunt of a series of reported twisters that just pounded the region overnight. >>> meanwhile, the northeast beginning dig out of a history-making blizzard. parts of the region, including the hardest hit
to pope john paul ii. he talked to people about how his demise seemed somewhat of a dishonorable end to his papacy. he had in his mind already what type of glorious exit, to use the phrase, he may want in store for him. let's get some perspective as to what is coming out of the vatican as to why this is happening, what it means. john allen, our senior vatican analyst, joins us now. what do we know, john? >> reporter: what we know is that we are living through a day of enormous shock here in rome. not so much the pope benedict xvi chose to resign. he signaled two years ago that he would be open to doing that, but the fact that we had absolutely no indication this was coming today. precisely because of that, therefore, there are some enormous unanswered questions about how all of this is going to play out. i suppose the biggest questions would be, "a," what will the role of a retired pope be? will he continue to play any kind of public role? will he continue to exercise any influence on the future direction of catholicism almost whether he wants to or not? and the second obvious questi
-to-day basis. i think we would be looking for vigorous and dynamic leadership, perhaps in the mold of john paul ii. >> archbishop of milan, the archbishop of vienna, gmt enoa, italy, two vatican cardinals in the mix, do you agree with the monsignor about the qualities of what needs to be considered as we look to who would take benedict's place? >> yes, i think the monsignor is absolutely -- as somebody who has studied this, the church has become quite diverse. while there's been a decline of things catholic in places like the united states, that is not the case in places like africa, latin, central america, central mexico. the activity has quite energized, so make a prediction that you'll see a greater voice of those communities, nigeria, brazil, mexico, because the catholic church and the conclave in particular has become more diversified over the years. don't forget john paul ii was the first known italian in 453 years, nobody ever believed that, so here we are 2013, and you might see a seismic change again. >> ray flynn, monsignor tom mcsweeny, thank you for joining me. i really appreciate i
this happened eight years ago when john paul died. you have this uncertainty. but you also have this other thing which is entirely new. 8:00 tonight, it's over. >> and to a certain extent, the pope and his cardinals are writing the rule books as we go along. one of these issues is, how much fanfare does the pope want as he says his good-bye. we saw the final audience yesterday. he had this emotional meeting with the cardinals this morning. is this the good-bye that he wanted? >> this is the good-bye, definitely. i mean, the people cheering right now are people in the secular state who work where i do. just two floors above where they are, the domicile. i think it's important that they were able to say good-bye. they didn't want anything huge. he had that with the audience. he's not somebody that likes big celebrations in general. i think it's only right that the people who worked with him, his clollaborators got to give him sendoff. >> as we watch his ride to the top of the hill to a white helicopter. a short ride to castel gandolfo, about 20 miles out of rome, it's his residence. and then the p
is going to resign his position. the end of the month. and, you know, he succeeded john paul ii who has rushed to make a saint. wrongly so, i think. not that he doesn't deserve it. you need some time. also the pope has said this is not the first -- not the first pope to retire. popes can retire. we are used to popes dying in. right? and most of them have. but a little quick research as we were getting ready to come on the air which is why i am not fully in uniform yet this morning. i will take care of this right now, the last pope i could find to resign was pope gregory xii. >> i don't remember him. >> bill: you wouldn't. back in the 15th century around 1415 or so there have been maybe a half a dozen popes to resign. he is the last one i could find. >> wow. >> yeah. there are a lot of explanations out there on twitter, supposedly for the vatican sort of indirectly saying it's for health reasons. he doesn't have the strength to serve in this role any more. so we don't know exactly what that means. there were rumors when he would resign when his butler wa
minimum wage is $7.25 an hour. john paul dejoria is here and he is the cofounder of paul mitchell systems. he is joining us now from austin, texas. ten dollars an hour. you say yes to that. >> yes. let me explain how. people are talking about increasing wages. for the employer, many employers, they are saying i am raising my payroll 25%. same productivity. i cannot afford it. a lot of people are thinking that way. how do you increase productivity and be able to pay people more money? that is the secret. if somebody is hired, for example, $7.25, whatever they are hard for, you work with them. in three to four months, it is the ramp-up period of time. we will learn the job and how to create sub productivity of what we are doing. our business can have at least 25% more income because we are increasing productivity. if we do end up to 30%, how about $10 an hour. human beings are capable of doing a heck of a lot more. dagen: you are talking about a decision made by the business owner and operator. a private decision. not one mandated by the government. if the government did move it up , if you
to be electing the next pope, and all of the cardinals under 80 were chosen by pope john paul ii or pope benedict, so you will not see a lot of the change, you know, in a lot of the policies, but really once the man becomes pope, anything is possible, because he can do whatever he wants to do. >> and there have been moments where we have seen the popes do extraordinary thing, and obviously vatican ii is the example. and are we at a moment to acknowledge a vatican ii moment, and john paul moment? >> well, the history of the cardinals is like the lightning that stroke the dome a few hours after the pope benedict resigned. anything is possible, but if we could retreat to the essence of pope john the xxiiird who inish y -- initiated the last vatican counsel which so many are not happy with, and we could go back to the people of god and inviting everyone to look to the levels of the signs of the times that is asked by the matthew gospel and point to the needs of the people longing, and longing to know jesus and feel the loving merciless presence in their lives through the understanding of the sufferin
a tough act to follow in the wake of global adoration enjoyed by his predecessor, pope john paul ii. he rose to the occasion, travelling abroad, two dozen times, including trips to israel, the united states and lebanon. born in germany in 1947 he was forced to join the hitler youth and nazi army but deserted toward the end of the world. cardinal ratzinger had an enforcement of catholic doctrine. he was tenure include sexual abuse scandal ins the church. accused of being slow to act to resol tv problem he gained credit for how he dealt with the crisis. >> handleed it sensitively and very forth rightly amid clarity. he brought in measures to try and stamp out the coverup culture and he brought in base for people to console. >> a great goal was to bring people back to the church, as what he considered the excessive secularization. he employed skills as a writer and a teacher. >> it was incredible effective. he sounded just like a real good parish catechism teacher. combination there of great depth. same time, simplicity in explaining some of the concepts. >> while he enlisted -- elicited l
succeed pope john paul ii. >> joining us is from the school of law. >> glad to be with you. >> one of my first questions, we think about the catholic church, it's been underfire and i know that you are very concerned about the moral decline of the world in general. so, when you think about the next pope, you've got to have to have somebody who will adapt and adhere to the catholic belief system. >> that's right, and i'm confident that the conclave will pick someone like that, an extremely good successor not just to benedict, but john paul iv. ap they had the history, the back-to-back, and i think there are a lot of cardinals out there who could fill those shoes. >> since you have an accurate track record of predicting the next pope, who is in the running? >> well, i'm not sure that i actually predicted it. i hoped that he would be the choice. and-- >> that's close enough. >> i don't know. you know, at this point, i don't think there's any front runner, and i think it is really impossible to predict who it's going to be. but, obviously, you have your favorites choices. i think that las ve
's not worn his heart on his sleeve. he's very different from his predecessor john paul ii who was all about hugs and embracing. yes, this was a day of rare emotion. you saw a lot of smiles as he went around st. peter's square in that pope mmobile to receive the final farewells. he spoke about how he had so much joy, he said, in the church in his eight years of reign but he also talked about how there had been difficult times. he said it had been fair from easy on occasion. he talk tbd church coming across agitated waters and finding themselves facing different directions of the wind. obviously he was talking about various crises and issues that the pope has to deal with and the church has to deal with,al those close to home who have rocked and buffeted those for years, most significantly the priests who have preyed upon young boy and an effort to hold those accountable, whose who did it and those who shielded the priests from scandal and accountability. all that is going on at the same time. more matterly as we await the conclave to convene and await the next pope, everybody's waiting. that
the last several years of pope john paul's papacy. the poor man was so wracked with illness and kept on coming out in an ever more frail state. he hasn't canceled any engagements. we're hearing rumors that he decided no more transatlantaic travel after trips to south america. the word we're hearing is fatigue. we're going to hear conspiracy theories ranging from everything to the vatican bank to the horrible sexual scandals. pope gregory in the 1400s was forced out. it wasn't volunteer. it was like a much more pleasant version of what happened to an curry. the last time this happened was back in the 1200s so almost 700 years since this has been done voluntarily. it's really, really a shock. this had guy has always been renowned for his command of power within the vatican walls. >> listening to everything you're saying and the history there, there's got to be more behind this. it's just not a job people and you can away from, and as history has shown us, i know there are conspiracies and all. what do you think is the reason he is leaving now? >> i wouldn't want to speculate. we'll hea
, john allen, who's one of the more perceptive ones. he said the legacy of john paul ii we're not going to fully appreciate until years from now and one of benedict's main job is going to be to help us unpack that ponticate. so they're going to be voluminous but it will take a while. i can rattle a few off. >> reporter: give me two. >> i would say the deep theological pro fundity than been expressed with amazing clarity and child-like simplicity. and second i would say his constant call that the church needs to be engaged with the world in culture. you know, christiane, there's some voices in the church today saying we need to retreat to the cat combs. we need to circle the wagons. ben xvi said the church is in the world. there's tons more if you ever want to invite me back. we'll go through his accomplishments. thank you, good to be with you. >> reporter: cardinal dolan, thank you very much for joining us. back to you, chris and erin. >> what a great interview, first of all. kudos for christiane. for people watching all over the world, you just got a look at what makes cardinal dolan s
. the pope was perfectly okay yesterday to me and predecessor pope john paul survived two assassination attempts, various cancer scares, crippling arthritis, and you had parkinson's as well. yet he battled on for 27 years. it does seem on the face of it very strange that pope benedict would walk away amid all the scandals being told and in the media of a secret gay network of clergy inside the vatican, the financial mismanagement and the firing of archbishop cardinal keith o'brien of inappropriate behavior towards priests in the '80s. when you put it altogether, where are we left, do you think? >> i take the pope on his word. he is 85 years of age. his health is declining. he knows his health is going to continue to decline. i am not surprised. modern medicine can keep us physically alive long after we can do the kind of job that it requires to be, to have the strength, the mental ability to do that kind of job, so it was inevitable that sometime during the 21st century we have a pope resign for a reason like this. now, you know, with regards to all of these scandals and stories that ar
of information 2005 when pope john paul died and as we watched the election of pope benedict xvi. obviously it had already come out in the united states and there are lots of reports but hadn't exploded in europe. i'm talking to vatican insiders and watchers who say this may explode in other parts of the world as well, that it is a bit of a ticking timebomb. in that regard, it is different. clearly the church is really -- they just simply can't believe that all these headlines are happening the very final week of pope benedict's reign. so they're desperately trying to get out from under this deluge of bad news and hope at least the next two days are going to be much more devoted to the final religious tasks of pope benedict. tomorrow he has his final general audience. they've handed out tens of thousands of tickets. st. peter's square behind me is going to be filled. there's going to be the traditional popemobile circular around st. peter's square. then the gradual ceremonial steps that are going to be taken before pope benedict xvi leave. but unprecedented in this way and, of course, becau
. i was here when pope john paul ii died in 2005, and it was completely different atmosphere. on this occasion, very much an opportunity for people, the faithful, to come and contemplate the legacy of pope benedict. many appreciated him as a teacher, a thinker, an intellectual. somebody who had the courage to confront many of the issues that have plagued the church over the last decade or so. the question of, for instance, pedophilia and the priesthood and other things. very much what they heard from people is they appreciated him as someone who faced and grappled with serious issues and appreciated the fact that he had the courage to step down at this point in his life. >> ben wedeman for thus morning. thank you for the update. you can hear them breaking down from the mass said a little bit this morning. here is what will happen from now on from here. pope benedict xvi has amended the conclave law. they don't have to wait for 16 days after the papacy is vacant. cardinals under the age of 80 will take part. four ballots a day. b ballots get counted twice daily. and dark smoke
for this pope have been selected by pope john paul ii or pope benedict xvi. it's not a real investment in our glory social justice in this church. i don't like to discount the holy spirit. >> can i ask you this question. if there are frustrations you have with the doctrine of the church, why do you stay in it? i'm always sort of interested in catholic reformers, people called to action a grouch folks trying to change the church direction from within it. the church is what is it. there's lots of -- you can be a unitarian. >> i went to yale divinity school with a ton of catholic students and faculty. that gave me time and years to figure out what i loved about the church. what hurts me about more traditional catholics that claim to love the church they have this view of catholicism that says it comes down what you believe about sexual morality where the beauty of this is is a kextra -- sacramental theology. this is what makes the church beautiful. that catholic imagination that we have. that really sue knick about the tradition. >> if you grow up encountering god and christ in the church then n
stepped down, because, remember, he watched john paul ii's demise and watched his powers fade, and what happens when a pope declines in power, the bureaucracy in inevitably increases. and i don't think he particularly enjoyed what was happening aat that time and may be seeing tremors again. and he decided to go ahead and retire early. >> let's stay on successors for a moment. any possibility that an american would -- we have dolan on there. is there any possibility we could see an american pope? >> i love cardinal dolan. i have known him since he was a priest. if i could elect a pope, i would elect dolan. but half of these election fors are europeans, the other half are predominantly africans and asians. the likelihood of them electing an american pope is remote. america has such a huge influence on the world to give them a papacy would be a bridge too far. that was the mind-set into the last conclave. look for a european, right now, if you were -- you know, begging me to give you an answer, i would probably say look at cardinal oullette from canada, who the pope incidentally sort of an
, pope benedict xvi does have something on pope john paul ii, the catholic church experienced a 6% increase in favorability, up from 56% during pope john paul ii's tenure and that's what the survey says. >>> coming up, she beats out her husband in almost every popularity poll. now michelle obama is back on the road and we'll look at what the second term may hold for the first lady. >>> first, the latest from south africa on where the olympic star accused of murder is now a day after being released on bail. you're watching msnbc. i've always had to keep my eye on her... but, i didn't always watch out for myself. with so much noise about health care... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a heart attack. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> more than 100 days after hurricane sand e some storm victims
of the way the terrorists conduct themselves, living among civilians. john: the pauling's show most americans support your position. 83 percent support using jones, 79 percent against american citizens. so i'm sure you want to weigh in here. your comments. >> hi. george mason university. you said drones are justified because the president is subject to congressional authority and has the duty to defend american citizens. ignoring for a moment, do you really think he has been subject to that much congressional authority? >> the framers, the framers of the constitution had just one of our country's independence by war. they knew the threat was that we faced as a small country. they knew we needed an energetic capability to defend ourselves. they wanted a strong commander-in-chief. they created a
he addressed you first but he and benedict would chat when benedict was waiting to see pope john paul. >> completely open. >> reporter: what was he like to talk to? >> very -- he would ask me what my interests were and how i felt and how i saw things. >> reporter: and with a sense of humor, like when benedict offered to sign widmer's copy of a book that he written which was pretty thick. >> when i gave it to him he said, you're really reading this? and i said, i'm trying. he said, it helps to do it in small steps. >> reporter: but he also had a personal crisis as a guard, spending his first christmas away from home. john paul helped him through that. >> i sort of had a meltdown and right at that moment he comes out of his apartment and he noticed and he reached out to me and he thanked me for being there and he gave me courage. >> reporter: what were you doing? were you crying? >> yeah. >> reporter: you were? >> i stopped crying but he in theed my red eyes. >> reporter: as for what's to come, the top job isn't what we think. >> the pope is the end of your life. you have to give up all
by his predecessor john paul ii. they will look for somebody who will continue the same ol' outdated policies. with this new conclave, you may get a new face for the catholic church, but it will be the same ol' stuff. and it ain't goting to work. see you back here go ahead on monday. >> this is "the bill press show." ♪ theme ♪ stephanie: ok, then, hello happy friday, everybody. jacki sheckner had to do an emergency valentine's day intervention last night. >> yeah. stephanie: we were having a rough valentine. however, we did not just get off a carnival cruise ship. >> so you're not covered in crap. stephanie: emotionally i am. >> i did administer tough love. stephanie: that's what you're good at. >> get over it. stephanie: get off the cross somebody needs the wood. >> she always feels good calling me and then whatever, get off the phone. stephanie: i get my tough love and i know she's got other people to move on to. >> pity party we wrap it up. stephanie: we're on a schedule here. stephanie: b.f.f. in the current news center, jacki sheckner. >> president obama will welco
the president and vice president as well as her replacement secretary of state john kerry. paul ryan is the first republican in the ratings, then marco rubio, jeb bush and speaker boehner. is it a taste of things to come if hillary runs in 2016? >> lefty blogs may be upset at steve doocy. i've seen other things on lefty blogs. i heard that steve doocy actually has calf implants. now, i don't have any evidence to back that up whatsoever. >> no. >> but, you know, just put a question mark at that. can we put a question mark at the end of that? >> you're referring to, of course, his own personal blog being implanted -- >> sam thought about getting calf implants because we're on a basketball team together. >> that's why he only does television from the waist up. >> exactly. >> just kind of a vanity thing. >> there is a nugget of probably something actually worth discussing here, which is our national obsession with hillary clinton and also the way women are scrutinized in the public lens. >> oh, totally. totally. >> and hillary, in particular, is an incredible sort of sign post for what w
? >> absolutely i do. liz: china, every treasury secretary going back to robert rubin, larry summers john snow, paul o'neill, geithner, paulson, they edged toward the chinese let your yuan, let your currency float freely in a fair and open market. minor, minor incremental improvements there but barely. at some point do you feel that the treasury department under this administration has to get a little bit stronger and push the chinese so it is a fairer situation where their currency floats freely like the rest of our currencies do in the open market? >> we have been very much engaged with the chinese over numbers of years. we continue to push them. not only our interest that they allow the ren minute by to fluctuate with market conditions. it is in their interest as we and they try to create conditions for balanced growth on a global basis. they need too do more. their currency is still undervalued but it has appreciated by 14% or so in real terms over the last few years. so that is progress. we will continue to stay at it as we engage the chinese on this he have important issue. liz: speaking
the memory of benedict's predecessor, john paul ii. have a listen to this. >> people said, if anyone should have resigned, it was he. parkinson parkinson's, couldn't get around. i think it is the image, the visual image of a man incapacitated. people say, well, how much is he really doing that? how much does he have his hands on the pulse of what is happening? >> chris cuomo this morning. father, do you think just straight up do you think his successor might find wisdom in the notion of hanging it up early, maybe set a precedent here? >> i agree with the quotations of the priest. we need a person, a leader, a real leader with good health, a wise man, continuing to train and i agree with benedict sistine and he has few guideline -- very clear, if i don't have the health, spirituality, mentality, and everything, i will resign. and it is simple for us. the doctrine is continuing to be the same. i think it is an example for everybody, the leader, the church, continuing. it is much better. resign now. >> italian popes, think of polish, currently german. looking at the statistics and the numbers
was very much like a battlefield, it's made a huge difference. in east philly john paul jones middle school had a reputation. >> police used to come to this school. used to be on lockdown. >> fight like these captured from a cell phone from the nearby middle school were common here, too. mold, fleas and rats ravaged the library so badly school officials had to throw away thousands of books. >> when i first came, i was pretty nervous. i thought it was going to be a little scary. >> the nickname came before the bars on the windows and doors. jones jail. >> but last september eighth grader tre'von williams says something happened. >> this became a whole new school. >> school district officials turned it into a charter school, gave it a new name and facelift and then called in the military. >> we needed to have people who are good role models, who believe in education and believe in youth development, and people that had a commitment really to america, and who else but veterans? >> i enlisted when i was 17. my parents signed for me. >> patrick's father is a vietnam vet and a purple heart recipi
, and he looks frail, looks old, but he seemed to be enjoying himself. john paul ii is very much a more engaging pope and not as much as a private man as benedict xvi is. he will leave here tomorrow around this time, by helicopter, and he will go to castle gandolpho and come back to the vatican in his retirement. he'll go into isolation, he's chosen that for himself. the vatican garden cottage as it were, it's not particularly comfortable, i'm told, i haven't been in, but it is somewhere he can spend his twilight years as it were, and he's 85 years old, let's remember that, in peace and reflecting on where he is, who he is, and how far he's come. today was very much an occasion of reflection for the 100,000 or so people who were here, brooke. it was absolutely amazing. we were up there, right at vatican city there and it was a sense of quiet, even though there are over 100,000 people there, so i say, a time of reflection and peace for so many of the faith. brooke? >> and history being made and now less than 24 hours from now, where you are in rome, becky anderson, my thanks to you. >>>
was standing in precisely the same place back in 2005, eight years ago when pope john paul ii died and we went into the conclave which finally produced pope benedict xvi. that took a week and several false starts. when they can't come to a consensus you have the black smoke emanating from that special chimney in st. peter's and then finally the white smoke and then you don't even know who it is until the archbishop deacon cardinals deacon comes to the window and announces a new pope and only after that the new pope comes to the within to and is greeted. but that was still at least two weeks away. at least tweaks away from that being finalized. >> is the italian media still all over the scandals that are going on involving sex and intrigue, all that stuff that we've seen in those rome newspapers over the past few days, or have they moved on? >> well, they pretty much moved on. that of course was a big story over the weekend and into monday, the beginning of this week. as you can imagine it drove the vatican mad. they were really angry, angry with the press for writing about it, angry for people
. john is right. paul ryan was against it, the president walked away from it, we could not get a bipartisan consensus for a plan that would revitalize the economy, produce growth and create jobs. it is a tragedy. >> i talked to a republican congressman why not vote for sink such and they say because of tax increases but i say you have already raised taxes, they have done that. >> the real answer they will not put the country first. how do we grow our economy? this washington game is all about their power and position and why the congress has 11 percent rating together. >> gentleman, all love to talk to you about what is going on in our country. can you get more from the political insiders every monday at 10:30 a.m. eastern and they will be back here next sunday, you can also follow them on twitter at "insiders." >>heather: a consume group is pushing the f.d.a. to put the squeeze on how much sugar goes into your favorite soft drink but is government regulation the answer? hi. hi. i'm here to pick up some cacti. it should be under stephens. the verizon share everything plan for s
this passed the congress, the republican congress, it passed with votes from john boehner, and paul ryan said when it happened he got 98% of what he wanted. only republicans gave us the sequester, only they can stop it. >> announcer: this is the "bill press show." [ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> stephanie: whatever, jim. jim is so competitive jacki. in the parking structure he's like ha ha, i got in the building first! >> into the building first? >> really? that does it for you? >> you compete about that? >> stephanie: love letter for jacki. dear steph. huge fan and podcast subscriber. everyone involved makes the show fantastic. you guide the show along masterfully. chris is more than he's given credit for. silliness occurs when healthcare geek jacki is in the studio with us. any way to have her there with you more often? >> well, there would be if jim ward didn't constantly sexually harass her. >> there is that whole restraining order. >> i'm several feet away from her. >> that's what the restraining order says. >> stephanie: why can't we have nice things. here she is in the current news cent
championed it. it was john boehner and company and paul ryan of the so-called budget hawks. they made it so disastrous that they thought nobody could ever, ever, ever go along with this. now they reversed themselves and say let's do it. i think the american people know whose fingerprints are all over this baby. i just hope that they come to their senses beforehand and it doesn't happen. there is other stuff in the news. when we come back, jesse jackson jr. and his wife both on trial here in washington, d.c. yesterday, lynn sweet who knows chicago politics and has covered chicago politics better than anybody else alive joins us in the next segment. she was in the courthouse yesterday. she talked to congressman jackson. she'll tell us all about it. >> announcer: on your radio and on current tv, this is the "bill press show." agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of his ability, is trying
. the republicans embraced it, voted for it. paul boehner voted for it. eric cantor, 174 republicans, john boehner said, i am so happy, i've got 98% of what i want. though passed it. now, they don't care if the rock falls on their head that's the bottom line. the super committee didn't do its job. now the rock's about to fall. they say, hey, let it fall. woodward is wrong. this is john boehner's baby. i don't want to get in a blame game etee. this is for our country. he no responsible. no responsible member of congress would let this happen to real americas. we are going to take a little time out. talk more about this later. time out to talk usmc arizona with chris orr from the atlantic coming up next. >> this is "the bill press show." live on your radio and current tv iq will go way up. (vo) current tv gets the converstion started weekdays at 9am eastern. >> i'm a slutty bob hope. >> you are. >> the troops love me. (vo) tv and radio talk show host stephanie miller rounds out current's morning news block. >> you're welcome current tv audience for the visual c
. this is what paul clement is arguing. >> bill: what john boehner argues. you don't need any special rights. you don't need any help or you don't need any particular support. >> listen, i've been called special since i was a small child. i'm not going to tell you what that meant. but i'll take the special rights. [ laughter ] >> bill: i love your comments on this, 1-866-55-press. you know, on public policy issues, we've learned it always takes a long time, you know, to get to the right place. but i must -- it has taken a long time on same-sex marriage. but in the last 12 months, maybe, right it has moved so fast. i think it just has my head spinning. in the right direction. i think it is great. for the president of the united states last year to come out in support of same-sex marriage. now for this big group of republicans to do so. and it was only ten years ago or less that republicans were using this as a -- against every liberal, every democrat in the country. >> absolutely. if you need any evidence of discrimination right, it was those -- it is now -- i think 38 39 states have bans against
. the top six conservative members of the senate, james from idaho. john cornyn of texas. now retired jim demint. the head of the heritage foundation, of course, now. pat toomey of pennsylvania. ron johnson of wisconsin and rand paul of kentucky round out the list. news busters caught double standard of of keystone pipeline protest we told you about early. news hour found 36 words for the march for life, hyping pipeline protest as the biggest climate rally in u.s. history in the segment nine times as long. while the protests were going on focus of the media gaze on the president's golf trip to florida with tiger woods. a pair of texans who are key, oil, gas and keystone pipeline players. the white house says president obama is committed to the environmental issues and the golf trip had nothing to do with the policy. >>> the u.s. postal service lost more than $40 billion in the last several years, billion with a "b" announced it would stop saturday delivery is getting in the clothing business. they signed a deal with the ohio based clothing company to produce line of apparel dubbed rain, heat
to make of this ted cruz. >> ted cruz was elected by a group of tea party maniacs. i get why rand paul does it another tea party crazy elected by tea party crazies. but john mccain who once was a maverick, you know, the creator of mccain-feingold, somebody who usually is moderate i don't expect that from him. this is just not -- this is just not john mccain behavior. >> it's kind of sick i think what john mccain has done with himself over a couple of different issues but specifically the chuck hagel thing. this was a guy that said chuck hagel would be qualified to serve in any leadership role. i don't get it. mccain looks silly in all of this. >> completely silly. at the end of the day, it makes me big the question like john, mccain what are you thinking? you were such a legend somebody who people applauded and looked up to. you could have had a career like ted kennedy. could have. but you are just squandering it, absolutely, positively squand squandering it. i remember when teddy passed and they had the people on the hill people lining the streets of the arli
through a republican primary. maybe they carve up the reasonable vote and rand paul walks through without looking. >> we know that jeb bush won the election in 2008. >> john mccain -- >> he also won, he took a hard line against immigration but was seen as a liberal republican earlier in his year. >> earlier in his career. >> at different points in his career. we tend to believe that moderate republicans can not get through the process but they have shown that it ends up happening. >> do they not get through the process, at the expense of, and look at the last republican primary as the example, by the time mitt romney picked up the nomination after the 112 republican debates that we were judged to. >> and somewhere to the right of herman cain >> i want do not think it's fair to paint taall the republicans with the mitt romney brush. >> the point that was being made is that even if you are not as. right leaning, as some would have you -- some folks may have you to -- some may try to paint you to be. by the time the primary is over, you have really come across -- >> it's true for both partie
, though, paul, the house has nothing to do with the cabinet nominations, you know the advice and consent is totally in the senate. chuck hagel, john brennan none of them, none of them have to be approved by the house. this is strictly a senate job. >> i realize that. i am saying, you know, why should he fight against the filibuster when there is nothing -- it's not going to get through the house. >> you fight against the filibuster, paul, to make the senate work. they should still be doing their job and then, you know maybe we would fix the house, too. although the house is operating under this hastert rule. it's the house equivalent of the filibuster. but i don't think -- i appreciate the call, paul. i don't think you can let harry reid off of the hook by saying action well, nothing would get through the house anyway. this nomination did not have to get through the house. can't use that excuse here bill is in newport richie florida. what do you say? >>. >> good morning. how are you? >> bill: good. thanks. >> caller: you made a comment about the system i
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